Baddha Konasana……

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Taking inspiration from the flutter of butterflies presently delighting us with their presence let us look at Baddha Konasana also known as the Butterfly or Bound Angle Pose. This pose is believed to have its origins in the typical sitting positions of the Indian cobblers hence the sanskrit term –   baddha, meaning “bound,” kona, meaning “angle” and asana, meaning “pose” or “posture”.

Baddha konasana is a basic seated asana that opens the hips and the muscles of the groin. while eradicating abdominal discomfort. The consistent practice of this pose can help with childbirth, urinary discomfort, and feelings of pain and heaviness.

To enter the pose, sit with the back straight, directly on the sit bones of the buttocks. Bend the knees, bringing the feet together in front of the body with the toes, arches and heels pressed against each other while the hands remain on the feet. Keeping the feet together, bring the heels as close to the groin area as comfortable. Enjoy deep breaths in this pose for as long as needed. Individuals can also practice the pose by gently bouncing the legs up and down like butterfly wings, or by tilting the upper body forward at the hips, keeping a straight spine, to increase the stretch.

Traditionally, baddha konasana is believed to stimulate the svadisthana (spleen or sacral) chakra, which is associated with creativity and determination. Stimulating this chakra through this asana is thought to foster inner acceptance, while also promoting focus and productivity.

The simplicity of baddha konasana creates a peaceful place to enter into meditations that involve matching the breath with movements of the legs (if bouncing) or allowing for slow, deep, relaxed breaths if folded in a forward bend. This asana can also assist in one’s final inward reflection when used at the end of a spiritual yoga practice.

Although this is a mild, stimulating posture, you should check with a doctor before performing the pose if you have any of the following conditions:

  • Groin or knee injuries
  • Lower back injury or a herniated vertebral disc

Information sourced from https:/www.yogapedia.com and https://www.gaia.com/

 

 

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